transparency seal




Transparency Seal explained

In National Budget Circular No. 542, issued on August 29, 2012, the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) reiterates compliance by all offices of the national government, including state universities and colleges, government-owned and controlled corporations, government financial institutions and local government units with Section 93, the Transparency Seal provision, of the General Appropriations Act of 2012, to wit:

"Sec. 93. Transparency Seal. To enhance transparency and enforce accountability, all national government agencies shall maintain a transparency seal on their official websites. The transparency seal shall contain the following information: (i) the agency’s mandates and functions, names of its officials with their position and designation, and contact information; (ii) annual reports, as required under National Budget Circular Nos. 507 and 507-A dated January 31, 2007 and June 12, 2007, respectively, for the last three (3) years; (iii) their respective approved budgets and corresponding targets immediately upon approval of this Act; (iv) major programs and projects categorized in accordance with the five key results areas under E.O. No. 43, s. 2011; (v) the program/projects beneficiaries as identified in the applicable special provisions; (vi) status of implementation and program/project evaluation and/or assessment reports; and (vii) annual procurement plan, contracts awarded and the name of contractors/suppliers/consultants.

The Circular also declares that the respective heads of the agencies shall be responsible for ensuring compliance with this section.


The Circular directs that the Transparency Seal must be prominently displayed on the main page of the agency website, and linked to a page within the agency website that contains the aforementioned documents in downloadable format. 



Symbolism of the Transparency Seal 


A pearl that is buried inside a tightly-shut shell is practically worthless. Government information is a pearl, meant to be shared with the public in order to maximize its inherent value.


The Transparency Seal, depicted by a pearl shining out of an open shell, is a symbol of a policy shift towards openness in access to government information. On the one hand, it hopes to inspire Filipinos in the civil service to be more open to citizen engagement; on the other, it seeks to invite the Filipino citizenry to exercise their right to participate in governance.


This initiative is envisioned as a step in the right direction towards solidifying the position of the Philippines as the Pearl of the Orient – a shining example for democratic virtue in the region.

 

DENR compliance with Transparency Seal (per Annex 2 of DBM Memo Circular No. 2018-1 dated May 28, 2018)

    • I. DENR MANDATES AND FUNCTIONS, NAMES OF OFFICIALS WITH THEIR POSITIONS AND DESIGNATIONS, AND CONTACT INFORMATION

                                a. FAR No. 1. Statement of Appropriations, Allotments, Obligations, Disbursements and Balances (SAAOBDB)

OTHER FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REPORTS

d. FAR No. 1-A. Summary of Appropriations, Allotments, Obligations, Disbursements and Balances by Object of Expenditures (SAAODBOE)

e. FAR No. 1-B. List of Allotments and Sub-Allotments (LASA)

   e.1. FY 2019
   e.2. FY 2018
   

 f. FAR No. 3. Aging of Due and Demandable Obligations (ADDO) (Annual)

   f.1. FY 2018

g. FAR No. 4. Summary Report on Disbursements

 i. BED No. 1 Financial Plan

        1. e.1. FY 2019
        2. e.2. FY 2018
        3. e.3. FY 2017
        4. e.4. FY 2016
        5. e.5. FY 2015

                      VII. ANNUAL REPORTS ON THE STATUS OF INCOME AUTHORIZED BY LAW TO BE DEPOSITED OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL TREASURY, including the legal basis, beginning balance, income collected, and its sources, expenditures and ending balance (indicate if not applicable)

a. BP 100-B Statement of Other Receipts/Expenditures
a.1. DENR Off-Budget Account for 2019
a.2. DENR Off-Budget Account for 2018
a.3. DENR Off-Budget Account for 2017

b. FAR No. 2.  Statements of Approved Budget, Utilizations, Disbursements and Balances (SABUDB)

b.1. FY 2018 (Q1) (Q2) (Q3) (Q4)

c. FAR No. 2-A. Summary of Approved Budget Utilizations, Disbursements and Balances by Object of Expenditures (SABUDBOE)

c.1. FY 2018 (Q1) (Q2) (Q3) (Q4)

X. THE AGENCY REVIEW AND COMPLIANCE PROCEDURE OF STATEMENTS AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

News

June 4 to 10 of every year is Philippine Eagle Week

AGAWID: THE UNTOLD STORY

Sighting for the birds of prey

For decade wildlife experts and biologists of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) in Central Luzon have been monitoring the vast and diverse mountain ranges of Sierra Madre in the portion of Nueva Ecija and Aurora to confirm the presence of Philippine Eagle. Wildlife officers have been tracking down this birds of prey and were unfortunate to confirm its existence in the area.

In 2000, local communities have observed this raptor flying in the clear sky, probably hunting for its food. But they are unsure of its true identity. However, this sighting further gave hope to conservationists to continue its quest in probing the existence of Philippine eagle in the mountain ranges of Sierra Madre.

According to literature, Philippine eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) is the world's largest eagle. Sadly, it is also one of the endangered species in the country. Standing at three feet tall and with a wingspan of seven feet, it is no doubt that the Philippine eagle is truly king among the great birds of prey.

The Philippine eagle can live to between 30 and 60 years of age. It feeds mainly on flying lemurs, palm civets and monkeys, hence the alternative common name of 'monkey-eating eagle'. Other prey items include rats, snakes, flying squirrels, birds and bats.

This species is endemic to the Philippines and found on parts of the larger islands of Luzon, Samar, Leyte and Mindanao

A rescued raptor

Hope never fails. Sometime on June 2016, an upland farmer found a juvenile eagle trapped in a snare or “silo” that was used in catching monkey inside the Aurora Memorial National Park (AMNP). The wildlife sustained no serious injuries in the ordeal.

The raptor was immediately turned-over to the DENR-Community Environment and Natural Resources (CENRO) based in Dingalan and was transferred to the custody of the Biodiversity Management Bureau (BMB) where it was cared for until its release into the wild. It was estimated that the eagle is just three years old.

The bird’s existence finally confirmed the presence of this critically endangered species in the Sierra Madre mountain range, a truly pride of Central Luzon.

Life in captivity

Agawid was placed in custody at the DENR Wildlife Rescue Center in Quezon City where the young eagle undergoes treatment and care. Agawid was placed in an eagle dome cage to prevent any human interaction. It was 17 months in captivity.

On May 2017, Agawid was transferred to a hack cage and brought back to a forest area in the national park of Aurora. The eagle undergoes a six month hacking process to ensure his survival and adaptive capacity in the wild.

Return to the wild

After more than a year of captivity, the young female Philippine eagle was released into the wild on October 4, 2017 in the forests area of AMNP. The released was historic and symbolic as it coincides with the confirmation of Secretary Roy. A Cimatu.

The spectacular eagle weighs approximately 5.31 kilograms just before its release. The eagle was named “Agawid,” an Ilocano word meaning “go home”. The eagle was able to return successfully to its natural habitat. It has been fitted with harnessed with radio transmitter to help DENR authorities monitor the eagle’s activities.

On April 2018, DENR Aurora and BMB conducted a re-trapping and monitoring of the young Agawid to check its health condition.

Today, Agawid is learning to hunt and survive in the wild. There are times that the young eagle return back to the community to hunt pets and other domesticated animal as an easy prey.

Portion of AMNP along the highway in Barangay Villa Maria in Maria Aurora town has been a favorite spot for many tourists as they enjoy a closer look of Agawid alights in the tree tops of tall dipterocarp trees in search for prey.

Agawid is being closely monitored to protect against illegal hunters and poachers. The eagle is a true symbol of the Filipino and crown jewel of Philippine biodiversity.

Let us protect Agawid and its habitat.

It is our country’s national bird, a beacon of hope and barometer of our ecosystem.

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